Skip to main content

Full text of "Fox Exhibitors' Date Book 1930/1931"

See other formats




I 



CALENDAR 1930 


JANUARY 


JULY 


S 


M- 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




i 


i .. 


1 


2 


3 


4 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 














1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 










30 


31 


























APRIL 


OCTOBER 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 






1 


. 2 


3 


4 


5 








1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


27 


28 


29 


30 








26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 
2 


S 
3 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


29 


30 












28 


29 


30 


31 









Name 



Address . 




It will be our endeavor dining the season 1930-1931 to maintain the 
highest possible standard of'quality in our productions consistent with 
the changing conditions in our industry and the taste of the motion pic- 
ture audiences. Bear in mind that in the production of motion pictures 
creative genius is th£ foundation of our efforts and we are dealing 
with an eferfient that occasionally calls for changes in story, plot or 
characters in order to obtain the perfection which is our goal. 

With this end solely in mind we must naturally reserve the right to 
change story, plot, cast and'director to furnish you with tne product 
that will sell at your boxoffice, and we therefore notify you that the list 
of cast, story and director is only tentative, and subject to change with- 
out notice except in such cases where definite book or play is desig- 
nated, such designations will remain unchanged. 



TO THE READER 

Holidays — both national and state, present excellent 
opportunities for increased profits to the showman if he 
makes proper use of them. 

Therefore they are given in their proper places in the 
calendar. To them are added anniversaries of historical 
significance which are also of value with special exploita- 
tion. 

Brief suggestions as to how to make use of them are 
given in the text pages. In a book of this size it is impos- 
sible to go into detail or do more than suggest. It has been 
the idea to stimulate thought and original planning by the 
exhibitor rather than to give a plan complete. 

Obviously an anniversary or holiday observed in only 
one state is of interest to the residents of that state only. 
Therefore the reader must be on the watch for those special 
days of significance to the state in which he is located. 

Among the historical anniversaries listed are some of 
particular interest to the residents of one city or town. Such 
days can be made bonanzas to exhibitors in those places. 

The best showmanship avails little unless the pictures 
are good. In the world's largest and most complete talk- 
ing picture studios — Movietone City — have been or are 
being made for the new season 48 dramatic, musical or 
humorous productions of a quality to challenge your admir- 
ation. They have been made possible by a twenty-five mil- 
lion dollar production appropriation. 

It is to help you realize the utmost profit from these 
splendid pictures that this book has been compiled. 

The dates for holidays and anniversaries given herein 
are taken from sources believed to be thoroughly reliable 
and have been selected with the utmost care. But as local 
holidays are often subject to change or special proclama- 
tion their strict accuracy cannot be guaranteed. 



Week of July 6, 1930 



PAID ADV. REELS 



1846 — Commodore Sloat takes possession of 



California 



~ 



__ 



4 '— - 



_*___ „ 



. 



~zz 



a* : , 



— 



____ : 



— - — ^~ 

_3_2_£2__Z___£_ 




_— : 



r<?x - tftws ry* 



*** // J -^ 



1890— Wyoming become^ a^state. No holiday 




_ „ 



W<yy v ^ 



3^< 



W f7yj 



SUN. 

6 



MON. 



U 



•i- 



WED. 

9 



- 



THU. 

10 



FRI. 

11 



SAT. 

12 



/ 



f\ 



The significance of the anniversary of the entrance of a state into 
the Union is shown by the fact that several states have made legal 
holidays of such days. 

However, in the majority of the states these anniversary dates seem 
to have been overlooked. Here is an opportunity for alert exhibitors 
to capitalize upon them, initiate celebrations in which their theatres 
are the very centre, get much high class publicity and derive very 
satisfactory profits. 

Look up in this book the anniversary date of the admittance of your 
state to the Union, or in the case of the thirteen original states — New 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, Penn- 
sylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina and Georgia, the date of first settlement if available. 
Most of these dates are given herein. Start in with your preparations 
some time before that date. See your local editor or editors. Except 
in the case of the large metropolitan papers they will be glact to co- 
■ operate with you, and play up the anniversary. Go to the superinten- 

dent of schools and the school principals under him to enlist their co- 
operation by special exercises in the schools and mention of the cele- 
bration which you are going to put on at your theatre. Get contests 
started of historical essays by the school children, with passes to your 
theatre as prizes, and the lure of the reading of the winning essays by 
their writers in the theatre. 

You can doubtless secure the mayor, or the head of the local his- 
torical society, or an eloquent clergyman, or the head of the local 
chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution or the Daughters of 
the Revolution to deliver a brief address on the opening night of 
your celebration. 

Your state has a flag. The local librarian will tell you what the 
pattern is, and if you can't buy one locally get a seamstress to make 
you one. Hang it over the sidewalk so that everyone can see it. Have 
your marquee signs tie up to it. "STATE DAY. ANNIVERSARY * * *". 
Decorate your entire lobby and front with flags. See if you can't 
borrow old rifles such as were used in pioneering days, old pictures of 
state interest, and other relics to place on exhibition in your lobby, 
each one properly tagged with a descriptive card. 

There still live in the newer states persons who pioneered. Seek out 
one or two of them and have them at your theatre as your guests. All 
this is good for publicity. 

Try to put on pictures in keeping with the occasion. For instance, 
for one of the western states what could be better than "The Big 
Trail"? As for your music many states have songs definitely associated 
with them, for instance there are "Maryland, My Maryland," "On the 
Banks of the Wabash," (Indiana) "Carry Me Back to Ole Virginny," "My 
Old Kentucky Home," "Carolina Moon,' "Swanee River" (Florida), etc. 
Build your whole musical prog, am around your own state song if there 
is such a one. Have a good singer render it as a solo. Invite the 
audience to join in on the chorus. 

The chances are that in many states the exhibitor who puts on such 
an anniversary celebration will be the first to have called attention 
to it in years. He will get much credit for it. He will find that Boards 
of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions and all the 
rest will be glad to back him up. And a letter to the governor of the 
state, telling him that you are going to celebrate the anniversary and 
asking for his endorsement will probably get you a letter of endorse- 
ment which you can use in publicity, and hang framed in your lobby. 



/ 

Week of July 13, 1930 




^— _ 







"" 



f~ 



PAID ADV. REELS 




■ • ■: 



-f 



=— 



- — - 



MON. 



14 



TUE. 



15 



x 



3 L 



'f 






— 




-4 



- 



WED. 

16 



THU. 



17 



FRI. 

1 c 




COMMON CLAY 




CONSTANCE BENNETT 

LEW AYRES 
TULLY MARSHALL < MATTY KEMP 

BERYL MERCER 

• 

A big stage hit, it will be an 
even bigger screen hit. It's 
great! Intensely emotional 
and highly dramatic screen 
adaptation of the Harvard 
Prize Play by ClevesKinkead. 



Directed by 

VICTOR FLEMING 



MAN TROUBLE 

totth 

DOROTHY MACKAILL, MILTON SILLS, 

KENNETH MacKENNA, SHARON LYNN 

and ROSCOE KARNS 

Story by 

BEN AMES WILLIAMS 
Directed by 

BERTHOLD VIERTEL. 




J 




t"> 




Week of July 20, 1930 



_ 



T ~ 

PAID ADV. REELS 



n/v *?<? 



ZT 



j^UL 



***^^» I^H 



yy? ? » 2- £ j^j 



* 



} 



~r~~ 



i~ — 



ri 



+—- 



SUN. 



20 



MOl 

21 




X' ' 7 



Due to the great diversity in climate and growing sea- 
sons, observance of Arbor Day is not uniform and the day 
falls in different months in various parts of the country. 
Several states make it a holiday. The day is always, we 
believe, recognized by special exercises in the schools. It 
offers good opportunities for special exploitation and tie- 
ups. 

Get permission from the authorities to plant a tree in a 
public square or park. If your theatre faces such square 
or park all the better. Plant the tree either in honor of your 
theatre or the picture star playing your theatre on that day. 
The newspapers will give you publicity on this stunt, par- 
ticularly if you "dress it up" with all the trimmings of music, 
two minute speakers and the like. If done in cooperation 
with a public school, better still. 

In many cities it is possible to secure the loan of speci- 
mens of the different native woods. As a lobby display, 
properly cased to protect, it will attract attention. Many 
lumber companies have such collections in their offices and 
should be willing to loan provided credit is given. Devote 
some space in your program to Arbor Day and the import- 
ance of trees. Use catchlines like "Civilization depends up- 
on trees. Guard them. Plant them!" For any special in- 
formation as to trees and Arbor Day write the Nature Maga- 
zine, Washington, D. C, telling them you are going to cele- 
brate Arbor Day and want some material to print in your 
program. If we are not mistaken these people publish and 
sell little booklets on tree conservation which could be 
given away as souvenirs by your ushers. 

Give a forestry setting to your stage. With ingenuity 
your ushers if girls can be costumed to represent various well 
known trees like the birch, pine, maple, elm, etc. 

For short subject to run with your feature, get a suitable 
one showing the big trees of California or Oregon, lumber- 
ing, and the like. 



K 



37417 Niles Blvd W2M 510-494-141 1 

Fremont, CA 94536 www.nilesfilmiintseuni.org 



Scanned from the collections of 
Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum 



Coordinated by the 
Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 



Funded by a donation from 
Jeff Joseph 



f^&)k 



It 



Week of July 27, 1730 

r /f/7- At-^J*' 8 "^ 




-u^ :_ 



\fj ?.-T & C~? 



— 




, 



f 



MON/ 






30 



v/<y 'yy^ 




THU. 

31 




SAT. 

2 



N*Lf 



*/\ 



_? 



FROM THE HEADQUARTERS FOR WESTERNS YOU WILL 
GET 4 MORE OUTDOOR ROMANCES TO FOLLOW THE 
(SMASHING SUCCESS OF "IN OLD ARIZONA" AND 
"THE LONE STAR RANGER" 

NO FAVORS 
ASKED 

with , 

John Wayne, Dixie Lee, 
Noel Francis, Warren 
Hymer, George Corcoran 

Stor> b> PAUL LEICESTER FORD 
Directed b> ALFRED WERKER 




RELEASED AUG. 31 



GEORGE O'BRIEN 
WARREN HYMER, LOUISE HUNTINGTON, 

RUTH WARREN LUCILE BROWNE 

From Max Brand's novel "The Untamed' 
Directed by ALFRED WERKER 

The Fox studios have perfected outdoor recording to a degree that is Hi© 
marvel and envy of other studios. 

In these brilliant new outdoor romances you not only get alluring and exciting stories 
of frontier fiction but you also get sound recording that brings the realism of life itself I 



& 






Week of August 3, 1950 



m 



— 



PAID ADV. REELS 



1914 — Germany declared, war on Fran 



I?i4 — Germany declared, war on Pranper 



Civic Holiday, Canada 



•* i - 
— — 



~- 



Primary Election, West Virginia 



— ' 






:.:_ 



— T. 



__ 



tlCTV-ll^ll ICIINC39 



>see. Not a holiday 



7 




sun.'* y 



MON. 



il 



TUE. 



' ^**^^L 



WED. 

6 



THU. 



FRI. 

8 



SAT. 

9 



Give every ticket purchaser a coupon entitling 
him to reduced price admission on the first day of 
any other month. Distribute postcards with space 
for a New Year's resolution, and with "Resolved: 

Not to miss a single program at the ." 

Theatre during 1931" at the bottom. 

Enlist the cooperation of one ot your local dall- 
ies in an essay contest for school children on the 
subject of Andrew Jackson, with admissions to 
your theatre as prizes for the best efforts. Get out 
hand-bills carrying Andrew Jackson's likeness, 
with "Celebrate the Anniversary of the Battle of 

New Orleans at Theatre," as the display 

line. 



Give free admission to all Confederate veterans 
who served under Lee. Enlist one of your local 
dailies in a drawing contest for school children, 
with admissions to your theatre as prizes for the 
best likenesses of General Lee. 

(Arbor Day, Florida) 

If your theatre faces a park or public square, get 
permission to plant a tree in name of the picture 
star whose feature is playing your theatre on this 
date. Invite some prominent citizen to be in 
charge of the ceremonies. 



Week of August 10, 1950 




■>jj i/3 .0 *j c Xz 




— 



V / r> ~ 



— ~ —yt 



WED 




THU. 



14 



FRI. 

15 



SAT. 

16 



*■ 




ARE YOU THERE? 



(temporary tille) 

with 

BEATRICE 
LILLIE 



JOHN GARRICK ■ OLGA BACLANOVA 

JULIAN SAND • LLOYD HAMILTON 

GUSTAV VON SFYFFERTITZ 

GEORGE GROSSMITH 



The sparkling star of English comedy in the role of a de- 
tective posing as a big game huntress — bagging laughs 
at every turn. Story and dialog by Harlan Thompson. 
Words and music by Grace Henry and Morris Hamilton 

Directed by Hamilton MacFadden 



RELEASED 
SEPT. 28th 





JOHN M c CORMACK 

SONG O' MY HEART 

Youth, love and comedy woven into a wistful romance by the great 
voice of the great tenor Acclaimed by press ond public. Beauti- 
fully presented and acted. 
* *tor> b> Tom Barry 

Directed by 

FRANK BORZAGE 



' 




Cast 

Maureen O'Sullivan 

John Garrick 

J. M. Kerrigan 

Tommy Clifford 

Alice Joyce 

Farrell Macdonald 

Effie Ellsler 

Emily Fitzroy 

Andreas de Segurola 

Edwin Schneider 



f&X *)&*'*. %-2£ 




Week of August 17. 1930 



Discovery Day. HoHday Yukon Territory in 



PAID ADV. \k 

■-' tf" 



Canada 



y.^^B^^^ i^^ 



W^ti 




9 y^y jft 



y*# t 





w^ 



SUN. 

1 



MON. 



VI 9P-7 a <£ ^ 






\u\Jk\ M* Cl * 




WH>/3VK 



S^rr^rLgL-ilLlmrLi^. filfifrtion Tpvrig Holiday 





if v/\ I 

n 




21 



FRI. 

22 






SAT. 

23 



Decorate your theatre front lavishly with flags 
and bunting. If possible, get some Civil War pho- 
tographs or relics for lobby display. Give admis- 
sion free to Civil War veterans. Begin each pro- 
gram of organ or orchestra with the national an- 
them. 

(in Georgia) 

Remind the public in your newspaper advertis- 
ing of this anniversary. 

(Arizona) 

Advertise that all persons who present them- 
selves at the box office with proof that they were 
born on the day that Arizona was admitted to 
statehood will be guests of the management. 



If there is a hospital with World War Veterans 
in your town, a special matinee for them will bring 
you much newspaper space and good will. Dec- 
orate with flags and a portrait of Washington — 
preferably arranged so that it can be illuminated 
at night. Essay contests may be arranged through 
cooperation with public schools. If your lobby is 
large enough to permit, a Washington Birthday 
dance following the final evening performance 
will attract wide attention. 



Decorate your theatre. Issue numbered coupons 
with admissions, and hold a drawing, giving state 
flags to holders of the winning numbers. 



Week of August 24, 1930 J^(f}( 





ON YOUR BACK 



with 

IRENE RICH 

RAYMOND HACKETT 

WHEELfR OAKMAN 



Difctid by 

GOfhrie 

McClinHc 



RELEASED 
SEPT. 14th 



H. B. WARNER 
MARION SHILLING 

ILKA CHASE 




] 



KO 



Week of August 31, 1930 



PAID ADV. REELS 



* 



XptotS&rfafy -holiday all/state|^j>licl€|$fc-C<|ijKa 



^ydW&X . 



* 



,P f iraar y- Elect ion M i "c h ! - c? n Nor* cr ho ! i d 



Al9|rW^vacla # Wiscons,rn 



* / 



19(^19,5(^,000 acreslland opened J^^etyfe 
/ment in t5klahomo 



,?vw 



^ . ..,-' 



— - 



\ 



Lafayette Day and anniversary battle of the 



Marne. Not a holiday but celebrated in 



New York and 10 other states. 



• 



/-< 







SUN. 

31 



TUE. 



2 



WE 



D. ' ' < 



THU. 

4 



FRI. 



**X 



SAT. 



■ ' 






,<2> & 



(in Pennsylvania) 
Draw attention to this date in your advertising. 

(Arbor Day, Arkansas) 

Plant a tree either in the name of your theatre 
or in the name of a picture star whose feature is 
playing your theatre on this date. Invite some 
prominent citizen to be in charge of the cere- 
monies, or cooperate with the neighborhood pub- 
lic school. 

(in South Dakota) 

Advertise that election returns will be an- 
nounced from the stage during the evening per- 
formances. Distribute handbills during the days 
preceding the election, listing your coming attrac- 
tions, with "Elected — By Popular Favor" as a dis- 
play line. A/ /L Cs *~ 




(in Maryland) *j "TJ 

Play up the occasion in advertising and lobby 
display. 

(in Alaska)'/ ^^z <£~ v*/ 
Display flags and portrait of Seward. 

(in North Carolina) 

Enlist the public schools in an essay contest, with 
"Patriotism" or "The American Revolution" as the 
theme, and award free admissions to the winners. 
Through cooperation with neighborhood mer- 
chants, other prizes can be arranged. 



fO Y- W&V/^^^V 



Z- 



Week of September 7, 1950 



zzz 



_ 



- 







J— 



— 



• 



MOTl - 






_____ 

i w 







■f 






fi^zA^ ^ 



— 




- 



PAID ADV. REELS 



■ 






SUN. 



N. 



8 






TUE. 

9 




i i 







10 



THU. 



li 



FRI. 

12 



SAT. 




with Marjorie White, Walter Byron, Joyce 
Compton, Dixie Lee, Richard Keene, Frank 
Richardson, George Corcoran, Leslie Mae, 
Goodee Montgomery and Rex Bell. 

Just what its title implies. Tuneful, beautiful, ultra 
modern, a feast for both eye and ear. And what 
a cast! 

Original story by Owen Davis. Screen play by 
Russell Medcraft. Music and lyrics by James 
Monaco and Cliff Friend. Dance numbers, 
staged by Edward Dolly. 

Jack London's 




"^ 



RELEASED 
SEPT. 21st 



Greatest Story! 

THE 

SEA 

WOLF 



MILTON SILLS 

JANE KEITH 

RAYMOND 

HACKETT 

Mitchell Harris 

Nat Pendleton 

John Rogers 

Harold Kinney 




A mighty drama 
and hate at sea. "Wolf" 
Larsen is the unforget- 
table character of fiction. 

Dialog by S N Behrman 
Screen play by Ralph block 




Directed by 

ALFRED SANTELL 



/ 




'ns -**<o 



Week of September 14, 1930 



PAID 


ADV. 


REELS 




s«. 








*, 


SUN. 


i 


44 


. 










- 






MON-' 




15 


t 


1 /' V* 








■ 




P riroa m lie c tl on mag s a c bu soft s>* N« w VKd?. 


TUE. 


Wot a holiday ^r 


16 
















a>94 t 'j^_ p p"; ioiiT3W'©T* ! '^o si4-.Lt P h 1 1 Q 


WED. 


- 


17 


















THU. 

18 




■ — — — £«_. 
















FRI. 

19 




















SAT. 

20 









./. 



Thomas Jefferson's Birthday: 

Although this is an officially designated holiday 
in but one state, Alabama, there is no reason why 
exhibitors elsewhere should not emphasize the 
date and at the same time draw attention to the 
attraction which will be playing their theatres on 
that day. 

State Elections and Primaries: 

You can cash in on public interest in an election 
in several ways. Distribute handbills in the days 
preceding election, listing your coming attrac- 
tions, with "Elected — By Popular Vote" as a dis- 
play line. 

Advertise that election returns will be an- 
nounced from the stage of your theatre during the 
evening performances election night. You can 
arrange for this in cooperation with a local news- 
paper. 

Kids are often more interested in the machinery 
of an election than their elders. As an advertis- 
ing stunt, get out imitation ballots, with the names 
of picture stars to be "elected." These, with the 
name of your theatre prominently displayed, will 
bring business. 



While many people refrain from amusements 
on this day, remember that there are a great num- 
ber for whom this holiday is an additional oppor- 
tunity for theatre-going. Make your appeal 
accordingly. 



Announce a Patriot's Day program. Decorate 
the front of your theatre in honor of the occasion. 



/w- 



/ 



f 



Week of September 21, 1930 






wr 



— 



5# 



PAID ADV. REELS 



t 



-j j J , i- 

__ _ 



Aa^ 



SUN. 

21 



MON. 

22 




S 



THU. 

25 
_ 

FRI. 

26 

SAT. 

27 



ft { ~ A/ &W S%20 

Week of September 28, 1930 



— 



S# 



_ 



: 



■■■■ ■■ i ■■ 



- 



. - - 



/ i/p z ^ - 



? — - 



\ft 



PAID ADV. REELS 



/ 



//* 



SUN. 

28 



Ml 



MON. 



29 



TUE. 

30 



WED. 

31 



THU. 
Oct. 



FRI. 

2 




(in Texas) 

A generous display of flags in front of your thea- 
tre will not only draw attention to the holiday, but 
it will draw patronage to your theatre. 

(in Nebraska) (see "Arbor Day") 

(Confederate Memorial Day) 

Arrange for a loan exhibition of war relics in 
your theatre. Extend an invitation to all veterans 
of the Confederate Army to be your guests on 
this day. 

(in Rhode Island) (see "Arbor Day") 



Arrange for a loan exhibition of war relics in 
your theatre. Extend an invitation to all veterans 
of the Confederate Army to be your guests of 
ihis day. 

(in Arizona, Missouri) 

Distribute handbills among the school children 
announcing that a souvenir will be given to every 
boy and girl who brings his mother to the theatre 
on Mothers' Day. You can tie-up with local mer- 
chants so that these gifts will carry advertising, 
and cost very little. From your local art dealer, 
you can secure a copy of the famous Whistler por- 
trait of his mother, which makes an appealing 
lobby display. 




Week o( October 5, 1?S0 



/■' 



znz 







PAID ADV. REELS 




£\ ^yyy to 








% ,-. SL+ /V, .j l_ 






A 







■^i f 9r s~ 



= 



■$=± 






TUE. 



7? 



A. 



• 



J 




FRI. 

10 



SAT. 



W?f 







DEVIL WITH WOMEN 

with 

CHARLES FARRELL 

EstelleTaylor,Rose 
Hobart, H. B. 
Warner, LeeTracy, 
Mildred Van Dorn 
and Guinn Williams 

From the celebrated stege play 

"liliom" by FroniMolnor. Dialog 

by S. N. Behrmdn. Adaptation by 

Sonya Levien.Musicby Richard Foil 

Borrage, winner of the Photoplay Modal 

for hit '7th Heaven", Charles Forrell. 

proven the mo*f popular mon of the 

screen by hi* victory in the Chicago 

Tribune and New York Daily News pop. 

wlorify contests, and "tiliom". the play 

thof rocked New York— what a combin. 

otion for success I 

RELEASED 
OCT. 5™ 





YOUNG 


SINNERS 


with 


LOIS MORAN 


FRANK ALBERTSON 


J. M. KERRIGAN 

and 


WILLIAM COLLIER, SR. 


From the play by 
Elmer Harris 


Adaptation and 
dialog by 
■ -■^•.■teT -sS^«> Maurine Watkins 





It is something new to get an out 
standing New York stage success 
hot from its record run. "Young 
Sinners" was a hit of the 1929- 
1930 season. It puts the micro- 
scope on modern youth, but in a 
way they'll love to see and hear. 

Directed b> 

ALFRED SANTELL 








Week of October 12, 1930 




~ 



322 



PAID ADV. REELS 



t 



.*>" 






/ 



IU 



^ 



1871— CaLumbus Day; holiday Ariz., Calif., Colo., Cojfln 




DeL 



pfta., M 






0\§., Pei#ha./RA, T^lr:UtahUa<Wasl., W. Va 




N. 3. 



- 



__, 




^^0^7^ 



— 



^-¥ 



v^ 



TUE. 



14 



— 






WED. 

15 



.i._'.. 




"^ 



-^ 



_.!.. 



\ 



r 



— — — 



THU. 



16 




^ 



■t 



— 



FRI. 



17 







AlaskwDwy th^ft territory 



SAT. 

18 



(in North Carolina) 

Enlist the public schools in an essay contest, with 
"Patriotism" or "The American Revolution" as the 
theme, and award free admissions to the winners. 
Through cooperation with neighborhood mer- 
chants, other prizes may be announced. Decorate 
your theatre in honor of the occasion. 

(Memorial Day) 

Arrange a decorated float to appear in your 
city's Memorial Day parade, calling attention to 
your current picture. Invite World War invalids 
to attend a performance as your guests. Draw 
patronage to your theatre by a generous display 
of flags and banners. 

(Southern States) 

Enlist the cooperation of one of your local dailies 
in an essay contest for school children on the sub- 
ject of Jefferson Davis, with admissions to your 
theatre as prizes for the best efforts. Get out hand- 
bills carrying his likeness, calling attention to the 
program which your theatre will present on the 
holiday. 



Announce that a small American flag will be 
presented to every tenth person who purchases a 
ticket at the box office. Display the Stars and 
Stripes in front of your theatre. 



' ^i>ir^L Y* 



Week of October 19, 1930 



<* 



/ 



PAID ADV. REELS 




WED. 

22 



VJ 9? 6~ 3 2 . 



THU. 

23 



Ov / Xr ■ I 



- 






_ 



- 



FRI. 



24 



SAT. 

25 



- 



T^= 



i\>f 





3 BIG 
MUSICAL 
ROMANCES 



Drama and mel 
bewitching^ the 
and the#ieart 







WOMA 
CONTROL 

with J. HAROLD MURRAY 

Mona Maris, Claire Luce, Sharon Lynn, Noel 
Francis, Marie Saxon, France's McCoy 
Based upon "The Mad Song" by Mabel Wagnall 

Scfeen play and dia- 
log by Howard J. 
Grjsen. 

Directed by 

Guthrie 

McClintic 



HER KIND 

with J. HAROLD MURRAY 

Louise Huntington, Luana Alcaniz, Irene^j 
Day, George Corcoran, Noel Francis, Gus 
Howard, Henry Victor, the Keating Twins 

Directed by A. F Erickson 



with 

J. HAROLD 
MURRAY 

Lois Moran, J. M. Kerrigan, Marie Saxon, 
George Brent, Lumsden Hare, Erwin Connelly 
Screen play and dialog by Tom Barry. Directed by A. F. Erickson 
! Music and lyrics by James F Hanley and Joseph McCarthy. 





Week of November 2, 1950 



— *- 





WILL ROGERS 

m LIGHTNIN' 

with HELEN COHAN 



From JOHN GOlDENS stage ploy 

by WINCHELl SMITH and FRANK BACON 

Screen play and dialog b> S N BEHRMAN 

Continuity b> SONYA LEVIEN 

Directed by HENRY KING 

One of the stage s greatest successes 
with a role made to order for the 
only Will Rogers. 




WILL ROGERS 

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE 

Rollicking romance from Mark Twain s celebrated 
novel with color settings by JOSEPH URBAN. A tour 
nament of action and a round 
table of laughs. Adaptation 
and dialog by OWEN DAVIS. 

Directed by 

DAVID 
BUTLER **& 



Charles Farrell as 

THE MAN WHO CAME BACK 






with Louise Huntington 

Splendid screen drama from Jules Eckert Goodmans 
thrilling and exotic play — photographed throughout in 
Fox Nature Color after designs by Joseph Urban, color 
wizard of world renown. Screen play and dialog by 
S. N. Behrman and Sonya Levien. 



Directed by FRANK BORZAGE 




Week of November 9, 1930 



= 



PAID ADV. REELS 



~ 



SUN. 

9 




1889— Wash 



~ flmAuck bay?*W}liday Aicr^jb., C*W., Colo! 

\/tf nn *7 lq t !!y ld T°' 'frj- W Ne »q 

V Wont., (I. rVfJ. J., fj. C./Nfc^D., PerTna., R. V 



TUE. 



D. r Term., Texns f Vt Vn In other states hj 

ernor's proclamation only. 






= 




u 

WED. 



/ 



THU. 



*■ 







FRI. 



14 



W// / 



/ 



X- 







A 



SAT. 

15 



\tf ?^ 



/•' 



(see Primary Election, March) 

(in Tennessee) (see Primary Election, 
March) 

(in Alabama and Nebraska) (see Prim- 
ary Election, March) 

(in Vermont) 

(in Texas) (see Primary Election, March) 

(in Wyoming) (see Primary Election, 
March) 

(in California and South Carolina) (see 
Primary Election, March) 



Enter a float in your city's Labor Day parade, and 
toss coupons from it along the line of march, 
announcing your current and coming attractions, 
and good for reduced price tickets for certain 
performances. Put your ushers in overalls, with 
linen caps such as mechanics wear. 

(in Nevada and Michigan) (see Prim- 
ary Election, March) 

This is your first opportunity to renew contact 
with school children after the summer vacation. 
The fact that it is the day which celebrates a great 
victory and a great defender of liberty gives 
ample scope for contests which can be arranged 
through cooperation with teachers. They will be 
glad to give their support, for essay writing, draw- 
ing competitions, etc., with tickets to your theatre 
for the best efforts. 



Week of November 16, 1930 



- 



PAID ADV. REELS 



c 







— 



- , — 



— - 



— L 



SUN. 

16 



w^-^lu^ 



MON. 

17 



i 



TUE. 

18 






g^ 



WED. 

19 



THU. 



20 






FRI. 



21 



w 1 








^__,> KKfcUThfcJ 



# I 



; 



JUST IMAGINE! 

Another knockout by 

BUDDY DE SYLVA, LEW BROWN 
ond RAY HENDERSON 

whose " Sunny Side Up " 

was lost year's 
biggest money maker 





with 

Maureen O'Sullivan 
John Garrick, El Brendel, Marjorie White, 
Frank Albertson, Hobart Bosworth. 
Mischa Auer 

Directed by 

DAVID BUTLER 

who directed "Sunny Side Up" 





THE 

MAKE 

with 
Mono Maris, Humphrey Bogart, Mrs. Jiminez, 
Michael Vavitch, Luana Alcaniz, Mono Rico 

Based on the story "Dust and Sun" by Clements Rip- 
ley, this fascinating dramo presents McLaglen 
as o light-hearted odventurer, who looks 
upon life as a sporting proposition 

Screen play and dialog by Dudley 

Nichols and Henry M. Johnson; 

adaptation by Dudley Nichols „ 

and Norman Holl _ v . :/ N '* v -_ — 

Directed by 

IRVING 

CUMMINGS 



of Second McLaglen Picture 
To Be Announced) 

He falls for the women, they fall for him — 
hard. The whole world gets a thrill and a 
laugh out of McLaglen as o lovemaker. 



I 



Chasing charmers and chasing the blues 
— that's McLaglen as they like him best, and 
they'll never like him better than in this one- 
Screen play and dialog by Edwin Burke. 
Directed by ALFRED SANTELL 







\ 



Week off November 23, 1930 



= 



— *_ — — — 

PAIDADV. RE^Lf^-**-' 



V4 



_ 



— — 



Repudiation Day, Maryland. Half holiday 




— 

- 



(/ sj 




/■ _ 



" 










SUN 

23 



MON. 



WED. 

26 



sait-12^ 




(in Maine) (see Primary Election, 
March) 

(in California) 

Cooperate with teachers in the public schools in 
an essay contest on "Why I am Glad I am a Cali- 
fornian", and give free tickets to those whose con- 
tributions are selected by the teachers as of high- 
est merit. | / 

/jf^i (see Primary Election, March) 

(in Maryland) * ® *~ ' 

Cooperate with teachers in the public schools 
in an essay contest on "Why I am Glad I am a 
Marylander", and give free tickets to those whose 
contributions are selected by the teachers as of 
highest merit. 



(in Massachusetts and New York)p. 5 



Cooperate with teachers in the public schools 
in an essay contest on "Why I am Proud of My 
State," and give free tickets to those whose con- 
tributions are selected by the teachers as of the 
highest merit. 







Week of November 30, 1950 







PAID ADV. REELS 




JANET 
GAYNOR 

3 Brilliant Pictures 
with 
3 New Leading Men ! 




ALONE 
WITH YOU 

with JOHN GARRICK 
Directed by FRANK BORZAGE 





ONE NIGHT IN PARIS 

with KENNETH MacKENNA 
Directed by GUTHRIE McCLINTIC 



n BARCELON 

with HUMPHREY BOGART 
Directed by JOHN FORD 

Winner of the popularity contests conducted by the 
Chicago Tribune and the N.Y. Daily News, Miss Gaynor 
again is strikingly demonstrated to be America's favorite 

For box-office profits these pictures! 

are the best that money can buy.M 





^x?£Mztt 



w 



V/d 



eek of December 7, 1950 



-r 



■ 



PAID ADV. REELS 



i<" 



Immqfulate Conception, Province of Quebec 



_ — __ — — : 




= 



i—i- 



sjf^V 








r 







-*-; 

- 



— 



WED. 





SUN 



M 



ON 



s 




11 



FRI. 



12 



<- %6 %1I 



Handbills for neighborhood distribution, with 
the display lines, "Columbus Discovered America! 

Have You Discovered the Theatre?" 

will prove effective attention-callers for the week 
preceding Columbus Day. School tie-ups in con- 
nection with the event may be made with great 
success. Through cooperation with a stationery 
store, a school globe map might be awarded to 
the holder of the winning number at one holiday 
performance. 



(in Alabama) 



(in Alaska) 



(in Nevada) 

Cooperate with teachers in the public schools 
in an essay contest on "Why I am Proud of My 
State," and award free tickets to those whose con- 
tributions are selected by the teachers as of high- 
est merit. 



(see Primary 
Election, March) 



A.../ 



Week of January 11, 191 



/ 



PAID ADV. REELS 



SUN. 

11 



:: 









MON. 

12 



TUE. 

13 




r> f> o 



'^-., 



WED. 



14 



THU. 

15 



FRI. 

16 



SAT. 



17 




America s 
2 Biggest 
Favorites 





JANET ■■HHraOBB CHARLES 

GAYNOR and FARRELL 

in 

OH, FOR A MAN! 

Their Only Joint Appearance 



America's two largest newspapers, the 
New York Daily News and Chicago Tribune, 
I have just completed contests to determine I 



the most popular stars of the movies. 

Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell both won 
by wide margins! 

"Sunny Side Up" and "High Society Blues" J 
have shown you what business to ex- 
pect with this undoubted high- 1 
spo oicture of the season. 

Be ready for the _ .. r% * w • i* ■» . . » ■ r> o 

rush , 7 Directed b> DAVID BUTLER 



. ■' } 



>» 



Week of December 14, 1930 



f^O^ 



— 



PAID ADV. REELS 



f-t 



m 



— 



tt 



v i 7 (* &> I 



JM 



SUN. 



14 



MON. 

15 



TUE. 

16 



WED. 




•>' 



with 



EL BRENDEL 




it-. *M 


W^^ *^'W ^^^^ 


Keating Twins 








Frances McCoy 




:. .V 


v >^^hh| 


Claire Luce Gus Howard 


^K * 


m \ 


Black & Blue 


1 




Marie Saxon 






Dixie Lee Lee Tracy 






Richard Keene 






William Collier, Sr. 


" -Ww 


Rk/1 


Irene Day Nancy Kelly 


wi 


I - Al 


and 500 beautiful 
Hollywood girls 


.•xmSsWva 

II 


Oil 


Dances staged by Seymour Felix 




1031 



*i*tl 



Bigger and snappier than 
either of its predecessors — 
with more girls, more laughs, 
livelier songs and faster fun. 




Directed by Sidney Lanfield 





SOUP 
TO 
NUTS 

||A feast of gags, girls, laughs, songs 

and dances prepared by 

RUBE GOLDBERG 

Dance numbers staged by Edward Dolly 
Music and Lyrics by Grace Henry and Morris Hamilton 
Directed by Benjamin StolofF 



with 

TED HEALY and his gang 

STANLEY SMITH 
LUCILE BROWNE 
HALLAM COOLEY 

Charles Winninger, Frances McCoy, 
William H. Tucker, George Bickel 




I d 



r 



\y 



Week of December 21, 1930 



-*— 



( - ^ 

1620 — Pilgrims land< 



PAID ADV/REEL9 



ed on Plymouth Rock 



lyrn 



x J i<*- 



^MCf C jl '7 3 




Christmas Day. Holiday LL S. nnd Cflrf&ada 



/i^^T^fsh^Trg^rr^defe 




N* 1 X 



t^- ■ 



CTv^er 






3 



^ 



/. 






SUN. 

21 



MON. 

22 



/ 



TUE. 



*- 



WED. 



24 



THU, 

25 



SAT. 

27 




/ 



?x 



November 11 

The World War is beginning to acquire historical 
interest. You will be astonished at the amount of 
interest which you can build up with a lobby dis- 
play of war-time posters and photographs. A 
special matinee for war invalids will bring your 



theatre much publicity 









xi>r^ 




(1930) Noverftber 26 (1931) 



Through cooperation with merchants in your 
neighborhood, a Thanksgiving gift night — an eve- 
ning or two before the holiday — can be made to 
attract wide interest. Announce that the articles 
to be given for the lucky numbers will be useful 
with the Thanksgiving dinner — carving sets, 
roasters, baking dishes, etc. Such a feature will 
be bound to attract patronage. 



A Santa Claus in front of your theatre is always 
a good bet. A Christmas tree in connection with 
a gift night will attract a wide public. Decorations 
of holly, wreaths and bells in your lobby, are im- 
portant eye-catchers, as well as fostering the hol- 
iday spirit. 



/. rs^Sr&*z^i 








jp^d. 



Week of December 28, 1930 



w 



FAtf) ADV. REELS 








ntv uzy'/ 



jj/\ 



_ 



- — ■ 



\ 



■ 




^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■HniiM 



xA , .:■' 



.»»■- 








SUN. 

28 



MON. 

29 



TUE. 



30 



WED. 




SAT. 




Victor McLaglen and 
Edmund Lowe in 

WOMEN OF 
ALL NATIONS 

with Claire Luce Luana Alcaniz 

How Flqgg and Quirt would 
maintain peace on earth. Old 
favorites in new adventures. 





Directed by 

RAOUL WALSH 

who directed "The Cock Eyed World" and 
"What Price Glory" 

Written by 

Laurence Stallings and Maxwell Anderson 
who wrote those two big hits 




THIS MODERN 
WORLD 

with 

WARNER BAXTER 

Luana Alcaniz JiMian Sand 
Ruth Warren 



The story of an American girl who 
loved lightly until she met the 
strange Basque, who overwhelmed 
her by strength of body and mind. 
From Eleanor Mercein's novel, 
"Basquerie", with dialog by Lynn 
Starling and John Farrow. 



Directed by Alexander Korda 




Si 



<1 



s 



■• 



i^d 



Week of January 4 f 1931 



>x&d$b 



orrtes qu*far^ /^ 



7 



PAID ADV. REEI 



1912 — President Taft proclaims admission h 

— — : 

■•vey\o as stute / ^ 



N 



ry 



— 

Anniversary battle New Orleans. Holiday La. 



yi 



Arbor Day i^tiisia iw '' Mm L l ITB ' hJa y. 




__: 



s — ?*vr 



>, 



SUN. 



MON 



TUE. 



^ 




WED. 



THU. 



S, , 



FRI. 



~ 




* 



. 



I 



with 

LOIS 
MORAN 

KENNETH 
MacKENNA 

MONA 
MARIS 

MAUREEN 
O'SULLIVAN 





PLAY 
CALLED 



LIFE 



Dancing was 
her life— 
until the pace 
became toe 
fast. Modern, 
racy, youth- 
ful and vivid. 



From the stage play by GERALD du MAURIER and VIOLA TREE 

Screen play and dialog by EDWIN BURKE 

Directed by CHANDLER SPRAGUE 



MICHAEL BARTLETT 

in 

THE HEART BREAKER 



Young, 

handsome, * ^ 

magnetic and rrbs zx 

with a glorious voice, you're going 

hear a lot about Michael Bartlett. He'll 

be a sensation. 





Directed by VICTOR FLEMING 



J Week of January 18, 1931 



t+ 



j Jimmammm 



PAID ADV. REELS 



^____ 



~7 



gob 




"+*p 



Kentu<?1^,*MisspsilSpT; North Car 



olfra.yfcouth Carolina^ynnesi^i/ l\ ^irgijli^ |ele- Xl 



\A^ — / 7 / r 





, Mi ,dfci.m * * jl il TB —M— ■ WMM— — m. 




— 

MS 




-* — 



/ / 




- 



SUN. 

18 



MON. 



19 



TUE. 



FRI. 

23 



SAT. 




^ £=» 



t>~ty 




THE SPY 

with 

MILTON SILLS 
PAUL MUNI 
MARGUERITE CHURCHILL 

Underground schemes of international spies revealed in 
a breath-taking drama of the Soviet's all-seeing secret 
police. Screen play and dialog by S. N. Behrman. 

Directed by 

BERTHOLD VIERTEL 




^•^ 




BLONDIE 



with 



LOIS M O R A N 



Movietone drama of mid-ocean love 
and fast action, based on the short 
story "The Burden of the Blonde" by 
Stephen Morehouse Avery. Adapted 
by Marion Orth, dialog by Edwin 
Burke; staged by Melville Burke. 

Directed by Chandler Sprague 



and HUMPHREY BOGART 
ROBERT AMES 
DAVID ROLLINS 
ELIZABETH KEATI 
HELEN KEATING] 
ALTHEA HENLY 



■ ' N s d 

TING I 
G ^ 






ID ADV. REELS 




z 



g .. 



x A 



M4 



ffl 



w 



— - 







WED. 

28 



THU. 



29 



FRT. 



30 



SAT. 



tr* 







GIRLS DEMAND 
EXCITEMENT 



with 

EL BRENDEL 
Marjorie White 
Joyce Compton 
David Rollins 
Dixie Lee 



A glowing picture of the 
ultra-modern maiden — for 
audiences that demand ex- 
citement. Based on a story 
by Joseph Hilton Smyth and 
Porter Emerson Browne, 
with music and lyrics by 
James F.Hanley and Joseph 
McCarthy 





























































• 


- 


- 


- 



Directed by John Blystone 





he CISCO KID 



with WARNER BAXTER 
EDMUND LOWE 
Frank Albertson 
Joyce Compton 
J. M. Kerrigan 
Luana 
Alcaniz 



Baxter and Lowe revive in 
♦hese further adventures of 
O. Henry's lovable bandit 
their memorableperformances 
in "In Old Arizona." Dialog 
by Tom Barry. 

Directed by 
Raoul Walsh 




Week of February 1, 1931 







m 






Mexico 




PAID ADV. REELS 



- 



1 



SUN. 






MON. 

2 



V 



— - 



z 



*m 



/ 



■*-< 



— 



TUE. 

3 



WED. 



THU. 

5 



/^ii>U 








— 






SAT. 



fy# 





SCOTLAND YARD 



with 

EDMUND LOWE 

JILLIAN SAND 

J. M. KERRIGAN 

JOHN GARRICK 

LOUISE HUNTINGTON 



The story of a great 
crime averted by a great 
love, based on the Inter- 
national stage thriller by 
Denison Cliff. Screen play 
and dialog by Edward 
Childs Carpenter. 




LUXURY 

with 

JOHN GARRICK 
LOUISE HUNTINGTON 





Revealing the hidden dramas that are woven into 
milady's dress. Based on the Internationally suc- 
cessful dramatic novelty by Edward Knoblock. 
With color settings designed and supervised by 
Joseph Urban. 



Directed by ALEXANDER KORDA 



/ Week of February 8, 1931 



— 







SHE WEARS 
THE PANTS 

( 




A "natural" in title, 
cast, story and director. 

Directed by 

JOHN BLYSTONE 




say 



with 

Mil Dor 

Kenneth MacKenna 
John Garrick 

William Collier Sr., Ruth 
Warren, Nancy Kelly 
and Althea Henly 

Dane* numbers tugtd by 

seymour raw 

Screen play and dialof fry 
CARLE CROOKS! 





As a Saturday Even- 
ing Post serial story 
it captivated millions. 
The delightful ro- 
mance of the American 
plumber who plumbed 
the heart of a princess. 

Directed by 
HAMILTON MacFADDEN 



The PRINCESS 
and The PLUMBER 

with 

CHARLES FARRELL 



and 



MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN 



From 0* »tory Vy 

Alice Duer Miller 

Scran plij and dialog ky 

Howard J. Green 

Lyric* and mutic by 

William Kernell 




* 



Week of February 15, 1931 



- 



— , 



/-J-U 



—- 



, 

._ __ ; w 



' 



— 



/x*-w 



Ash Wednesday. 

- r- 



-=- 



__ 








z^-^ 









PAID ADV. REELS 



: 



fv 



/ 




15 



-.."". 



^ 



MON. 

16 



TUZ. 



WED. 

18 



THU. 

19 



FRI. 



20 

SAT. 

21 




RENEGADES 

with 

WARNER BAXTER 

J. M. Kerrigan Kenneth MacKenna 
Mitchell Harris Luana Alcaniz 

Buddies in the Foreign Legion — until a wom- 
an brought destruction to their strange com- 
pact. Breathless adventure in North Africa, 
based on Andre Armandy s novel "Le Rene- 
gat," with screen play and dialog by Jules 
Furthman Directed by Victor Fleming 




The mm^ 

PAINTED 
WOMAN 




Week of February 22, 1931 



~ 



PAID- ADV. REELS 



:o Unite 



+ 



& 



-fi** 







nniversar 




. 



~ 



SUN. 

22 



MON. 

23 



TUE. 



24 



WED. 

25 



— 

THU. 

26 



FRI. 

27 



SAT. 

28 




' 



r./v 



UP THE RIVER 



with 

Louise Huntington 
. . Spencer Tracy . . 

Joan Marie Lawes 
Claire Luce • Walter McGrail 
Humphrey Bogart • Lee Tracy 
Warren Hymer • Tyrone Power 
Goodee Montgomery 
Black and Blue ■ Joe Brown 
Elizabeth Patterson 



■:■ 



r 



/> 



They're Waiting for it! 
When little Joan Marie 
Lawes, daughter of the 
Warden of Sing Sing 
Prison, was signed to play 
in a story of prison life, 
the papers grabbed it as 
red hot news, and "Up 
The River" was launch- 
ed to the drum-beats 
of nation-wide publicity. 



Story jby 

MAUR'INE 
WATKINS 

Directed by 

JOHN FO 








NOWHERE 

with 

EL BRENDEL 

Marjorie White Lee Tracy 

Tommy Clifford 

Joyce Compton 

Marie Saxon J.M.Kerrigan 

Black & Blue 

William Harrigan 

Nat Pendleton 



A six day bike 
race with all 
the comedy 
trimmings — 
spills, sprints, 
and thrills. 
Laughs inevery 
lap. Screen play 
and dialog by 
Andrew Bennison. 



&*&; 



A 



<25> 






Week of March 1, 1931 




exjos Flgd^Upy; pgfc 



day 1836 when Texas seceded from 





'f ' K(J~Wa 






-i 



-* 



184: 



-in i,|-gf 



iC 




nn^yT^pnia. H< 



1 845 — Texas annexed by Unit 




~^^fo 








\ 18/6 — Massacre of the Alamo, Texas. Not a 



Arbor Day, Arkansas. Also California. Day 



selected because Luther Burbank's birthda 






Not a holiday. 



TUE. 

3 



WED. 






?HU. 

5 




SAT. 



CHARLES FARRELL 

in 

SHE S MY GIRL 



with 



JOYCE COMPTON 



Directed by 
JOHN BLYSTONE 




By vote of the readers of Ameri- 
ca's two largest papers— New York 
Daily News and Chicago Tribune, 
Charles Farrell is the most popular 
male star of the screen. Here he is in 
a romance as bright as the morning. 





Directed b> 
JOHN BLYSTONE 

S<tttn play and diul<>|> by 

TOM GERAGHTY 




MEN ON CALL 

with 

EDMUND LOWE 

MAE CLARKE 

GEORGE CORCORAN 

WARREN HYMER 

JOE BROWN 

IAN MacLAREN • RUTH WARREN 

WILLIAM HARRIGAN 

MARGARET QUIMBY 



RELEASED 
OCT. 12th 



Roaring adventure 
and rare romance with 
the U. S. Coast Guard 



II 






/ 



Week of March 15, 1931 



= 



— 







/~~14J&^ ^ ^ 



PAID ADV. REELS 



/SUN. 

/15 



M 16 



TUE 

17 



i 



WEtr. 

8 



- 



„_ 



THU. 

19 



FRI. 

20 



SAT. 

21 



/ ■,."■> 



/ 



Ma 



Week of March 22, 1931 



,.SUN. 

l22 



MON. 



s, 



PAID ADV. REELS 










Week of March 29, 1951 







r — t 



r 



- 



PAID ADV, REELS 



- 





i 



vara l 



AiasKa. 



* 



= 



_ 



r~ 








^i 



~ 



i 



? 



— 







~~ 



T±Z1 



SUN. 



M& ^S 



MON. 

30 



tu: 




WED. 
April 

l 



THU. 

2 




I V 




Week of April 5, 1931 



— 



SUN. 



-— 



— 



— - 



PAID ADV. REELS 



' 




MON. 

6 



TUE. 






WED. 



8 



- 



^2- 



~ v 



•1917— United S 




— 



iec!a 



£7Grmonv 






~ 



^11X4 




• 



THU. 

A 9 



1 




n 



— 



~~ 



.-^t, 



~^ 



KT^V 1 



- 



jg-CM^ 



/<? 




1 



\«vi 



^y?-?d@ 



Arbor Do. 



Alsd Art 



Week of April 







PAID ADV. REELS 




,' 




<-2 / Kr/^c*^'~d-^ 

Week of May 3, 1931 



- 

3 



.- 



PAID ADV. REELS 



m 



;■ 



MON. 



/ 



- 



v< 



TU2. 



- 



\ 



U^- 



1 .*" 



1 I 



WED. 

6 



_ 



THU. 



z: 



— 



._ 



- 7 0/0 "733 



FRI. 

8 



Arbpr Day, Rhode Island 

—. ' 






and RhJj! 
< 



WTO Kb 



ClL 



sat. 

9 










Week of May 10 f 1931 # 

— . . < / ■ — — 



PAID ADV. REtLS 



t^s^/ 'c 7r ' / /^J^^^ 




MfofhSEi 



_ r— 

' 5/ J K J : I i *£' 



i; 



^ 



km h Day Montana. Not a holiday 








SUN. 



MON. 

11 



^^s^—^'*^^ ? 



Week of May 17, 1931 



PAID ADV. REELS 




XV r 70 






WED. 



20 



THU. 

21 






rth Carolma. 



_ 







** "» ^ 



a- 



- 



■0a. 



_ 










" 



V 




HJ I z. ? 4 



/ ^dZzzl J%4drf 



__ 



Week of May 24, 1931 



„^7 / 



■!""-^° 



PA 



/' 



— 



= 



— 



_ 



_ 



ID ADV. REELS/ 

I. £cJ£Z':...s 



► f 







±zl 



— 



^y 



f^- — > '^'(stry 








_ 



— 



/ — 



z 



■ 



1 



j 



SUN. 



24 



MON. 



25 



TUE. 



2- 



WED. 



27 



THU. 



FRI. 



29 



SAT. 

30 



' 






i 1 



#9 



« 



Week ef May 31, 1931 



' J^Z-j£jt 



. REELS 




MON. 
June 







s 



_ 



.,, 






— 



- 



/ i 




WED. 

3 



THU. 



4 



FRI. 



SAT. 



M ,gtay of the Ki a ff Canada 








gi^i>doy "Jefferson Davis; holiday ]/ Aldbanfa 




Wkdr\as,/Flori^Kf, Georgia, Loufsi 



SISSI 




'* >J2 L_ 



^e 



• * " 



yj V4. I ^ 




Qs-f Sj 



- 










'nited States marines begTn battle at 



Chateau Thierry 



SflUb t,f. 






~ 



Week of June 7, 1931 



&±+ 



PAID ADV. REEL' 



7- 



(3 



— 







' 



Q M. 



SUN. 



MON. 

8 



TUE. 




K ^ySy~2 ^ 



— 



- 




"W / 5^3 J 




W^ 



2 



' 



FRI. 



-^2 



\ 




/ 







Week of June 14, 1931 



vv 




SAT. 

20 



^ ' M a 6' FX 







Week of June 21, 1931 I 



PAID ADV. REELS 



^/— =- 



S -- 







7— 










' 



C7 



4-Ar 




\A ) T it H V 



%u 





'SUN. 

21 



410 N. 

'22 



TUE. 

23 



WED. 



\24 



THU. 

25 



FRI. 



Week of 



: ~- 7 ~ 



> 



= 



-~>-. 



SUN. 

28 



\ 



MON. 



29 



r ■- 

I; - 



TUE. 

30 



WED. 

July 



:hu. 

2 



FRI. 



SAT. 



/ 



^ *7 x 



PAID ^PV. REELS 



C 



mF ^r 



^ 



T 



^ 




_ 











ZTZZ 







UflV l l> LUIV. I ■ I h 'i uJu 



1863-Battle of Gettysburg begun 



Zsi*j*As ,/e 



\ : 



r 



890— Idaho becomes a state. Not^a holiday 



398— Spanish fleet destroyed by American 



fle*J at Santiago 



776 — Anniversary of Declaration^ Independ 



Holiday in all state: 



z*i^ 



ssfev 



Weelnrf-Jiriy 5, 1931 



PAID ADV. REELS 



SUN. 




Week of July 12, 1931 



w 



■'• 1 

PAID ADV. REEL3 












■m 

12 


-nBF^^^Il 




y » 




i^M ' 




Jr :f ' Iff 1m 




- V 




Jf Jf Jj ^ 








MOTI. 






13 


~&9 W Jp* v « 










*^ 


ifflf *wjm ' 


It" 








99ik. 


W B \ 




14 


I v - 8 






If 


1* 






#w J 








WED. 


» HR. JBk 




15 


J ■■? ^^>mii, M , ^j 




o , .. 


."jff ^WJJWfllB-^RIijj Oj|jl|^ 




■ 










16 






*' S m ■Mr Jp' 






M JP 




«, 


jk ' - j|f 




£■■ 




E I '^Ik-Jr 


1 ■ 




17 




'n 






i 


>£** 


t^ ^2riHH t| 


















18 

















Week of July 19, 1951 




Week of Juiy 26, 1931 



im 

26 



Li. 
27 




375 — Colorado admitted to the union, mo 



day that state 



Week of August 2, 1931 



PAID ADV.. « EELS 




Week of 



t 9, 1931 




Week of August 16, 1931 




Week of August 25, 1931 



PAID ADV. REELS 




Week of August 30, 1931 






***»»%, 



PAID ADV. REELS 




Week of September 6, 1931 



PAID ADV. REELS 




12 



Week of September 15, 1931 




Week of Septei 



1951 



/* f 


„**!#**^ 


jffr m PA,D ADV - reels 


/7r£7 




Jfj***,. \ 


( 


/' 


20 






s 


48^ - niaiiir^ j»3r 


■ jfr- 


7} 


mF 






v-* 


21 


ft *j* * ' /JuT "* 


f; 


I 






jf ' u 


i 
/ 






'M 












■Mjjfr / '*"~ 


- 






e 


Jfe¥E. 


JBjf *«**^* # 


22 


■jBiiiEl * .A^^^ttMiiNMi^j^ 




VW*»S # 


' J$F ^hS * i > : 










j/F 








23 




' ' .jr " 




% ^tiBr ,*** 










fE¥. 










24 






jJ&F j&h 










FRi. 


;jBfr ^ '-^jfwj 




| 






25 


^J^^^jjJjSf*^^' % ^Br 






1 








^m j^f 




*' i 9. 










■ 

26 




jffF 






3 ^ 


R 











Week of Sepfe 



27 







— ^ 



Week of October q,-4ffii 



PAID ADV. REELS 




life 




PVi I 5 5 ICt 



Week of October 








mmu. 

1 







■SAT. 



Week of Qi 



ne 



_ 



m 



w 



7^ 



1864 — Nevada became sta 



M H 



Oil 



served there as "Ackm&sion Day" 



PAIESADV. REE 



^ 



( 



M 



♦ V 



MON. 

26 



— 



9V-Z. 



27 



WED. 

28 



-/ 



29 



//• 







Week of 




V-C- 




2y? 



Week of November IS, 1931 




mj <j q £ 




TUE. 

17 




WED. 

18 



V-^-i- 



ons, 







THU. 

19 



"/ 



/ 



- — • — * 

7*S 



t. 



x 



FRI. 



20 



AAA/:: 




-^- 



SAT. 

21 



# 



r 






*— 



i 



eek of November 22, 1931 



— ' 




PAID AOV. REELS 

■ i 







■ * ■ ■■ - 



O: 






VI 77v/ 



- 



■ I^HI 



= 



-■ 



I 

-\ 7 



. 



J — SUN. 

22 



MON. 

23 



TUE. 



24 



-**•> 





i°l . 



* : 



Week of November 29, 1931 



**t 



PAID ADV. REELS 






SUN. 

29 






MON. 



30 



TUE. 
Dec. 






WED. 

2 



THU. 



FRI. 



4 



r' 



SAT. 

5 



/ 



- 



- 



— 



sd^ 



-t 



7 



>v 



^ ,< r 







= 



m 





— 



— ~ 



y 



- 



- 



. ■ ■ 1 1 



7 






n 



— 






$ 



^tiTS^ 



■V 7^ 






^ 



iU9 



41 



< 



J 



^ w U t/f 

Week of December 6, 1931 





' 



I Jt 




\ 



o 




Week of December 13, 1951 



• 



— r- 



_ 



PAID ADV. REELS 



™ 



SUN. / 

3 




^ 









1 1 



: 



—- 



MON. 






_ 



JV IJ> 2 




TUE. 



<— ^ 



WED. 

16 



773 — Boston Tea Party 



; 



THU. 

17 



/ 











vy 







« 






FRI. 



18 



SAT. 

19 



/ *~5 



" » / * 



~ — 






J^-l 



? 



Week of December 20, 1931 



PAID ADV. REELS 




<\ Cs I Week 








ecembe 



i / 

i£ 



1931 



SUN. 



27 



- 



MON. 

28 






— 







TlXE. 

29 



r 



WED. 

30 




/ 



THU. 

31 



3ZZ- 





— 



FRI. 
Jan. 

1 



SAT. 

2 



^ 



PAID ADV. REELS 



- 



~~-\i >i 






y 



MEMO 




/ 




&F~* 




*\ 



s-Y. 






~X V. » ^ 







- > <^_ J? 



r 






>£^ 



\ 



/ 




Printed by- 
Prospect Press, Inc. 
New York City 



CALENDAR 1931 


JANUARY 


JULY 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 










1 


2 


3 








1 


2 


3 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 














1 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


22 


23 


24 


25 


28 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 
















23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 
















30 


31 












MARCH 




SEPTEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


2; 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


29 


30 


31 










27 


28 


29 


30 








APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


3 


4 










1 


2 


3 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


. . 


- ^- 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 












1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 












31 




























JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S. 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


. . 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


to\ 


28 29 


30 


* 


!__!. 





•• 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


'• •_ 


_ _*__! — 



Hi